September 24, 2018

Bionic Man ‘Lives’ With Synthetic Parts

A team of engineers has assembled and completed what is being referred to as a “bionic man.” He is composed of a number of artificial organs that simulate a human body’s natural processes including blood circulation. He is able to walk and to breathe. He is said to have between sixty and seventy percent of the functions of a human.

He requires a walking machine to walk and sit down. It is the same type of machine used by people who have spinal injuries. His artificial blood also carried oxygen just like real blood. The parts are incredibly advanced, but not yet ready to be used in humans. He current lacks a few other parts

The Smithsonian Channel will be featuring a special documentary about him on October 20, which is titled “The Incredible Bionic Man.” The program will show how he was built. The parts that compose the synthetic man came from seventeen different manufactures around the world. Shadow Robot Co. oversaw the cutting edge project.

He will be coming to the United States for the first time this week at New York’s Comic Con. The bionic man will be appearing alongside Bertolt Meyer. Meyer is a 36-year-old social psychologist at the University of Zurich.

Written by
Janet Van der Wiel

Janet van der Wiel is a reporter for US Updates.  After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania, Janet got an internship at a local radio station and worked as a beat reporter and producer.  Janet has also worked as a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Janet covers economy and community events for US Updates.

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Written by Janet Van der Wiel

Janet Van der Wiel

Janet van der Wiel is a reporter for US Updates.  After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania, Janet got an internship at a local radio station and worked as a beat reporter and producer.  Janet has also worked as a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Janet covers economy and community events for US Updates.

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