Opioid FDA

In 2016, the Opioid crisis that cost a huge loss of billions of dollars while thousands of people lost their lives. As a result, more than 11 million Americans misused the painkillers while 13,00 and even more people became a victim of an overdose.

Now, a new drug opioid is approved by FDA that is regarded as 1000 times more powerful with a comparison to morphine while 10 times potent as fentanyl.

Dsuvia, the drug is actually a fast-dissolve tablet developed as a substitute to the infusions of rapid-fire pain. However, it is prescribed just for short-term usage. Thus, it should be used within 72 hours and not more than that.

The drug’s side effects involve a doozy that is breathing problems, extreme tiredness, coma, and, of course, death in severe cases.

In the account of the hopes that the drug will not be abused, FDA is adopting some precautionary measures. Scott Gottlieb, FDA Commissioner stated that “very tight restrictions” would be done over the drug. Like its availability would be restricted at your local pharmacy. Instead, it would be only provided to “certified medically-supervised healthcare settings.”

However, these limitations are even not adequate. He was the one who showed severe response over FDA when it failed to ascertain the   “unique benefits over other available FDA-approved opioid products” so that the abuse risk could be justified.

In a testimonial, he noted that “an opioid that is 1,000 times more powerful than morphine is 1,000 times more likely to be abused, and 1,000 times more likely to kill.”

As per the statement of FDA, the drug was basically developed for military use. Since nobody desires to make soldiers suffer, various argues could be raised like during the war against opioid-related overdoses, several homes became battlefields.

As a result, in the United States, every single day, more than 115 people were fighting for their survival after overdosing on opioids.

Liam Bradley
Liam Bradley is the lead editor for US Updates.  Liam has been working as a journalist for nearly a decade having published pieces in many print and digital publications including the Philadelphia Daily News and the Huffing Post.  Liam is based in Philadelphia and covers issues affecting his city and state. When he’s not busy in the newsroom, Liam spending time with his wife and twin daughters.

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